Instead of linked indices, it is often better to use the built-in search function that is available on most devices.  By the time of this writing, it might be available on every device.

When you use linked indexes, the only thing that the page numbers can link to is the page where the text used to be in your Word file.  Or in your PDF file.  In the eBook, when a user clicks that, it might be several “screens" away from where the word is actually used.  (This is due to how Word sets the index links when you generate them automatically).  You can see how this could frustrate your reader.  This is why we recommend not using linked indexes.  If you want them, we are happy to provide them, but please give the matter some thought.  Remember that you want your reader to have the best possible experience.  Below you can, on the left, see a screenshot of a search on an iPad, and on the right, the result of clicking one of those search results.  Click the images to enlarge in a lightbox.  

LJ Sellers' The Baby Thief, showing a word highlighted, that the user wants to search for in the book.
LJ Sellers' The Baby Thief, showing a word highlighted, that the user wants to search for in the book.

 

For some books with only a few notes, a small bracketed annotation--i.e.., [1] inserted in the sentence might be best.

Thanks to L.J. Sellers, a Booknook.Biz client, who now has a major publishing deal with Amazon, for letting us use screenshots from her bestselling title, "The Baby Thief" on an iPad for this FAQ article.  You can read more about L.J. Sellers at Amazon by clicking here. 

The book now displays the search results, which you can go to with a tap--and then back to the page you were reading.  Pretty cool, eh?
The book now displays the search results, which you can go to with a tap--and then back to the page you were reading. Pretty cool, eh?

 

Phone Call Alert! 

(Please read, thanks.) 

Old Timey Switchboard Operator Cartoon

 

Due to the COVID-19 onslaught, we currently cannot take incoming phone calls.  

 

A notification about phone calls:  due to the COVID-19 plague, we've significantly increased our incoming inquiries--nearly double our usual volume--and the number of incoming inquiries by phone has been literally overwhelming.  Although most writers will say that their call "will only take 15 minutes," the truth is, that after 10 years of doing this, most author inquiry calls take an hour.  45 minutes at best. I'm currently receiving 7-10 calls/day, and due to that, I've had to stop accepting incoming phone calls, which my voicemail will tell you. You can leave a message--I can't call you back without one--and if a call is needed, I will of course call you.  But we have very complete and extensive email replies, handouts and our website is very informative. Almost all the questions that I receive during a call are actually already answered on our site, or are, in fact, publishing questions, not questions about our services, what we do, what we offer, or the like.  I already handle between 90-130 emails/day, as it is. I can't handle that many emails and take 7-10 hours of calls each day. I can't. So, in order to be able to answer this huge email volume, to help the greatest number of people, with my time, I've had to stop accepting calls.  I'm sorry, but that's just how it is. I'm in the process of setting up a call-appointment function, for free 15-minute calls to answer questions from new prospective customers and longer paid sessions for folks who generally want consulting on "publishing," generally (and for prospective kids' book publishers, as a special category of paid consulting).  But that functionality isn't yet set up. I hope to get that working the 3rd week of July, sometime.  

Thank you for your understanding.