Category: eBooks Converted and Formatted By Us
Author: Leonard Kennard
Price: 0

Description

The setting is North London, the time- now. Laurence is a damaged character with several neuroses. He has written a book- Return to Valhalla-but such is his fear of engaging in the publishing circus he cannot bring himself to submit it. He has a good friend, James whose hobby is amateur dramatics. Laurence sees James in a production of The Mikado and begins to see a possible solution. He persuades James, in his Japanese persona, to impersonate him as the author, believing that the book from a ‘foreign’ writer stands a better chance of acceptance.

It is accepted, James attends meetings with the publishers only to find that their marketing director is Japanese. This leads to a number of complications. Laurence, following a meeting with Ukoyo Mangeshi (Ukky), the Japanese marketing director, decides to ‘come clean’. He also finally agrees to live with Sophie his long term girlfriend in her windmill, Living in a calm environment and with the help of Colin, a sounding board for his anxieties, he comes to terms with the challenges that publication will present him with.

The author uses Laurence to tilt at the ugliness of our present society, the attitude of some publishers towards new authors and various other personal dislikes. Laurence loves polysyllabic words and overuses figures of speech such as alliteration. The author hopes that this literary device, although it makes Laurence appear to be pompous is recognised as simply a cover for his many insecurities. The author also hopes that this device will add to the humour.

Date insert: Monday, 25 October 2021

Phone Call Alert! 

(Please read, thanks.) 

Old Timey Switchboard Operator Cartoon

 

Due to the COVID-19 onslaught, we currently cannot take incoming phone calls.  

And since nobody reads anything, I've simply removed the phone number from the site.  

A notification about phone calls:  due to the COVID-19 plague, we've significantly increased our incoming inquiries--nearly double our usual volume--and the number of incoming inquiries by phone has been literally overwhelming.  Although most writers will say that their call "will only take 15 minutes," the truth is, that after 10 years of doing this, most author inquiry calls take an hour.  45 minutes at best. I'm currently receiving 7-10 calls/day, and due to that, I've had to stop accepting incoming phone calls, which my voicemail will tell you. You can leave a message--I can't call you back without one--and if a call is needed, I will of course call you.  But we have very complete and extensive email replies, handouts and our website is very informative. Almost all the questions that I receive during a call are actually already answered on our site, or are, in fact, publishing questions, not questions about our services, what we do, what we offer, or the like.  I already handle between 90-130 emails/day, as it is. I can't handle that many emails and take 7-10 hours of calls each day. I can't. So, in order to be able to answer this huge email volume, to help the greatest number of people, with my time, I've had to stop accepting calls.  I'm sorry, but that's just how it is. I'm in the process of setting up a call-appointment function, for free 15-minute calls to answer questions from new prospective customers and longer paid sessions for folks who generally want consulting on "publishing," generally (and for prospective kids' book publishers, as a special category of paid consulting).  But that functionality isn't yet set up. I hope to get that working the 3rd week of July, sometime.  

Thank you for your understanding.