Category: eBooks Converted and Formatted By Us
Author: Steve Bensinger
Price: 0

Description

In September of 1969, three young men meet on a college campus and decide to be roommates. They become friends as they drudge their way through what is for them and many of us the worst year of their lives, their first year of college.

Stan is a Mexican-American from a very rural area. Lenny comes from a wealthy family, and though he is enrolled in college, he spends most of his time attempting to launch his career as a comedian. Darius is an African-American with a near genius IQ. The three young men become friends and roommates. Like most freshmen they must adjust to a new and challenging academic environment, dating, dorm life and dorm food. Stan's challenges are particularly daunting: he must learn how to live in a world he thinks is strange, convoluted, and very confusing. The friends celebrate their joys together and help each other through a variety of difficult times.

But Freshmen is much more than a warm and compelling story about friendship and coming-of-age. The novel often is very funny. The young men enjoy many of the cultural high points of the 1969-1970 school year--"Laugh-In," "Abbey Road, and "Easy Rider." And they must deal with a suicidal neighbor, the draft, the war in Vietnam, the invasion of Cambodia as well as the campus unrest that followed.

Ultimately Freshmen is a universal story of hopes and dreams and an anthem about the importance of friendship and the value of brotherhood.

Date insert: Saturday, 25 September 2021

Phone Call Alert! 

(Please read, thanks.) 

Old Timey Switchboard Operator Cartoon

 

Due to the COVID-19 onslaught, we currently cannot take incoming phone calls.  

And since nobody reads anything, I've simply removed the phone number from the site.  

A notification about phone calls:  due to the COVID-19 plague, we've significantly increased our incoming inquiries--nearly double our usual volume--and the number of incoming inquiries by phone has been literally overwhelming.  Although most writers will say that their call "will only take 15 minutes," the truth is, that after 10 years of doing this, most author inquiry calls take an hour.  45 minutes at best. I'm currently receiving 7-10 calls/day, and due to that, I've had to stop accepting incoming phone calls, which my voicemail will tell you. You can leave a message--I can't call you back without one--and if a call is needed, I will of course call you.  But we have very complete and extensive email replies, handouts and our website is very informative. Almost all the questions that I receive during a call are actually already answered on our site, or are, in fact, publishing questions, not questions about our services, what we do, what we offer, or the like.  I already handle between 90-130 emails/day, as it is. I can't handle that many emails and take 7-10 hours of calls each day. I can't. So, in order to be able to answer this huge email volume, to help the greatest number of people, with my time, I've had to stop accepting calls.  I'm sorry, but that's just how it is. I'm in the process of setting up a call-appointment function, for free 15-minute calls to answer questions from new prospective customers and longer paid sessions for folks who generally want consulting on "publishing," generally (and for prospective kids' book publishers, as a special category of paid consulting).  But that functionality isn't yet set up. I hope to get that working the 3rd week of July, sometime.  

Thank you for your understanding.