Thomas. J. Occhipinti

Thomas J. Occhipinti is a second generation, Italian (& Sicilian)-American, born and raised in the Northeastern Ohio steel town of Youngstown(Struthers). At the age of eight, he won an acoustic guitar and eight free lessons in a raffle. His late father, John, was a professional guitarist, who sat in with visiting big bands in the 1930's era, including Harpo Marx's Big Band. Tom's older sister, Janice, introduced him to the new Rock & Roll and Motown sounds of 1950's and 60's. Inspired by artists such as James Taylor, Carole King, Paul Simon, and the Beatles, Tom began writing and performing original songs in coffee houses through out the Midwest while attending Youngstown State University in the mid 1970's. While still in college, he published his first songs with Bourne Music Company in New York City, working with the late veteran songplugger, Dick Stone. Mr. Stone had formerly worked at Paramount Music with the legendary Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and many others. Tom's first cut at Bourne Music was in 1977 by an artist with the last name of "Stewart." After Tom's initial excitement, his publisher, Dick Stone, then informed him, that the artist was not "Rod" Stewart, but "Doc" Stewart, a singing dentist from Pittsburgh. WELCOME TO THE MUSIC BUSINESS! Following graduation from Youngstown State University later that fall, Tom and his wife, Anne, relocated to Nashville in January of 1979. He began writing with Tree International, and eventually such artists as Mickey Gilley, Ronnie McDowell, Donna Meade, and others recorded his songs. Additionally, his songs were also placed in the hit "FAME" Television Series and used as regional jingles. During this time, Tom also worked as a counselor with troubled youth. In 1989, Tom wrote, published, and licensed an original song, "Video Diary", with the PANASONIC CORPORATION, for in-house promotional use. He also co-produced the accompanying two-minute film with a New York based production company. During that time, he also wrote and licensed a second song, "All the Way," which inspired PANASONIC'S 1992 Olympic campaign. The televised commercial debuted during a Thanksgiving Football game in 1991, and was seen by an estimated 22 million viewers. Video Diary was later re-licensed to Panasonic in 2008-2010, for an internet campaign, featuring Tom's daughter, Emilia. In 1997, Tom taught Commercial Songwriting at MTSU. The experience was very positive and convinced him to combine his free-lance writing with teaching. He enrolled at TSU and earned a Master's Degree in Education in 2001. Currently, Tom is a free-lance writer/publisher, speaker, and a Reading/Writing teacher/consultant. Tom is married to Anne, a veteran schoolteacher, and they are parents to a daughter, Emilia, and a son, Joseph. Tools, A Personal Memoir, is his first published e-book & CD/Digital audiobook.
 Thomas. J. Occhipinti

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Phone Call Alert! 

(Please read, thanks.) 

Old Timey Switchboard Operator Cartoon

 

Due to the COVID-19 onslaught, we currently cannot take incoming phone calls.  

And since nobody reads anything, I've simply removed the phone number from the site.  

A notification about phone calls:  due to the COVID-19 plague, we've significantly increased our incoming inquiries--nearly double our usual volume--and the number of incoming inquiries by phone has been literally overwhelming.  Although most writers will say that their call "will only take 15 minutes," the truth is, that after 10 years of doing this, most author inquiry calls take an hour.  45 minutes at best. I'm currently receiving 7-10 calls/day, and due to that, I've had to stop accepting incoming phone calls, which my voicemail will tell you. You can leave a message--I can't call you back without one--and if a call is needed, I will of course call you.  But we have very complete and extensive email replies, handouts and our website is very informative. Almost all the questions that I receive during a call are actually already answered on our site, or are, in fact, publishing questions, not questions about our services, what we do, what we offer, or the like.  I already handle between 90-130 emails/day, as it is. I can't handle that many emails and take 7-10 hours of calls each day. I can't. So, in order to be able to answer this huge email volume, to help the greatest number of people, with my time, I've had to stop accepting calls.  I'm sorry, but that's just how it is. I'm in the process of setting up a call-appointment function, for free 15-minute calls to answer questions from new prospective customers and longer paid sessions for folks who generally want consulting on "publishing," generally (and for prospective kids' book publishers, as a special category of paid consulting).  But that functionality isn't yet set up. I hope to get that working the 3rd week of July, sometime.  

Thank you for your understanding.