Can You Make My Scene-Breaks The Way I Want Them?

We can easily make your scene breaks easy for the reader to see. We use some white space above the first paragraph of the new scene. We usually put the first paragraph of the new scene flush-left against the left margin, so that it is obvious to the reader that something has changed, and that this is a new scene.

Sometimes a scene-break is simple; in modern contemporary literature, it's generally designated by a flush-left paragraph (instead of an indented paragraph), with some vertical spacing above it, as you can see here in Jackie Collins' "Chances:"

 

Jackie Collins' Chances, showing a scene-break indicated by a flush-left paragraph.
Jackie Collins' Chances, showing a scene-break indicated by a flush-left paragraph.

What If I Want To Jazz It Up?

But sometimes an author wants a little extra flourish. This can be obtained with the use of a "fleuron," a graphical device used to create visual impact, and to indicate scene-breaks.  You can see an example of the use of a fleuron in Sig Nilsson's "Howling of the Wind," below, shown on the Kindle Fire Previewer:

Howling of the Wind, demonstrating the use of fleurons for scene-breaks.
Howling of the Wind, demonstrating the use of fleurons for scene-breaks.

 

Scene-breaks can be whatever you choose--but whatever you choose, be consistent.  Many authors like hashmarks (###) or asterisks (***) in lieu of a graphical fleuron.  These are perfectly acceptable choices.  A reader can distinguish between a scene-break for a passage of time, versus a switch in POV (Point of View), as long as you are consistent with what you choose

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